Matchers and Mismatchers in the Classroom

When you have free time, do you like to enjoy doing things that you have always done or do you prefer to try out new things?

How about going on holidays? Do you like to visit the same place year after year or do you like to visit new places and experience different things?

Or learning – do you like to learn in the same way or do you prefer to us new technology to learn?

If you strongly prefer to have and do the same things that you have always have and done, then NLP would call you a Matcher. If you strongly prefer to have and do different things, then NLP would call you a Mismatcher.

Another way of describing this is to talk about Sameness and Difference. A Matcher looks for the same things as usual. A Mismatcher looks for different things.

Of course, most people are somewhere in between. So you might be mainly looking for the same and also looking for something a little new at the same time. Or you might be mainly looking for new things, but want a little bit of the familiar in there, too.

As you begin to think about this distinction, you will probably notice that each of your students tends toward Matcher or Mismtcher. Neither is better or worse in any way. They are just different ways of looking at the world, and both can be useful in different situations.

Once you start to notice this distinction, you can begin to tailor your classroom language to achieve the best results.

For Matcher: “This is very similar to what we learned last week, so you will probably find it easy to learn today’s topic.”

For Mismatcher: “Much of today’s topic is completely new, and I think you will find it interesting to learn it.”

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